Tsev kawm ntawv ntawm Waterloo

Tsev kawm ntawv ntawm Waterloo. Kev kawm ntawv hauv Canada. Txoj kev tshawb no sia mus thoob ntiajteb.

University of Waterloo Details

  • Lub teb chaws : Canada
  • Lub zos : Waterloo
  • Acronym : UW
  • Founded : 1956
  • Me nyuam kawm ntawv (approx.) : 31000
  • Tsis txhob hnov qab discuss University of Waterloo
Enroll at University of Waterloo

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In the heart of Waterloo Region, at the forefront of innovation, the University of Waterloo is home to world-changing research and inspired teaching. At the hub of a growing network of global partnerships, Waterloo will shape the future by building bridges with industry and between disciplines, institutions and communities.

From quantum computing and nanotechnology to clinical psychology, engineering and health sciences research, ideas that will change the world are at the heart of who we are.

In just half a century, the University of Waterloo, located at the heart of Canada’s technology hub, has become a leading comprehensive university with nearly 36,000 full- and part-time students in undergraduate and graduate programs.

Consistently ranked Canada’s most innovative university, Waterloo is home to advanced research and teaching in science and engineering, mathematics and computer science, kho mob, environment, arts and social sciences. From quantum computing and nanotechnology to clinical psychology and health sciences research, Waterloo brings ideas and brilliant minds together, inspiring innovations with real impact today and in the future.

As home to the world’s largest post-secondary co-operative education program, Waterloo embraces its connections to the world and encourages enterprising partnerships in learning, tshawb xyuas, and commercialization. With campuses and education centres on four continents, and academic partnerships spanning the globe, Waterloo is shaping the future of the planet.

Canada’s most innovative university by the numbers

Our people

  • 1957: University of Waterloo opens with 74 me nyuam kawm ntawv
  • Hnub no: 30,600 undergraduate, 5,300 graduate kawm ntawv
  • 15 per cent international undergraduate, 36 per cent international graduate students
  • 1,139 full-time faculty, 322 international faculty
  • Degrees granted: 5,778 Bachelors degrees, 1,723 Masters,303 PhDs (2014)

Our global influence

  • 1,000-acre main campus in Waterloo
  • Satellite campuses reinvigorating city cores across our region in Kitchener, Cambridge and Stratford
  • $2.6 billion per year in economic impact in Ontario (2013 Economic Impact Report)

6 Faculties

  • Applied Health Sciences
  • Kawm
  • Yam xws li tshuab
  • Environment
  • Math
  • Science

10 faculty-based schools

  • Accounting and Finance (Kawm)
  • Architecture (Yam xws li tshuab)
  • Balsillie School of International Affairs (Kawm)
  • David Cheriton School of Computer Science (Kev kawm txog zauv)
  • Optometry (Science)
  • Tshuaj (Science)
  • Tswv yim (Environment)
  • School of Public Health and Health Systems (Applied Health Sciences)
  • School of Environment, Enterprise and Development (Environment)
  • School of Environment, Resources and Sustainability (Environment)
  • Kev ua hauj lwm (Renison)

4 affiliated and federated institutions

  • Conrad Grebel University College
  • Renison University College
  • Me nyuam. Jerome’s University
  • Me nyuam. Paul’s University College

Globally recognized excellence

  • QS Stars 5+ ranking
  • Top Comprehensive Research University in Canada for eight consecutive years (Research Infosource)
  • Saum 25 nyob hauv lub ntiaj teb for Computer Science and Mathematics (QS Rankings)
  • Saum 50 nyob hauv lub ntiaj teb for Geography (QS Rankings)
  • Saum 100 nyob hauv lub ntiaj teb for Civil Engineering, Engineering hluav taws xob, Mechanical Engineering, Tej Sciences, Sociology, Architecture and Built Environment, Psychology, and Statistical and Operational Research (QS Rankings)
  • One of the world’s top 50 engineering schools (Ranking kev kawm ntawm tebchaws ntiaj teb)
  • #19 for Computer Science (TUAJ. News and World Report)
  • #47 for Engineering (TUAJ. News and World Report)

Students uniquely equipped for success

Waterloo students start strong and excel in a learning environment that is experiential, research-rich and real-world relevant.

  • $250+ million reported earnings by Waterloo co-op students (2014-15)
  • Two years after graduating, 89 per cent of Waterloo co-op students work in a field related to their degreecompared to 75 per cent of all Ontario university grads
  • #1 for career preparation (Globe and Mail University Report)
  • 54 per cent of students have an entrance average of 90+ ib npib tooj per (2015)
  • 17,600+ work terms in 60+ countries nrog 6,300+ organizations

Some of the top companies who hire our students include:

  • Apple
  • Barclays
  • BlackBerry
  • Bloomberg
  • Bombardier
  • Ernst & Young
  • Facebook, Inc.
  • Fairfax Financial
  • Holding Ltd.
  • GM Canada
  • Google
  • OpenText
  • RBC
  • Sun Life Financial
  • Twitter
  • The Hospital for Sick Children
  • Toyota Motor Manufacturing Canada Inc.

Tsev kawm ntawv / Qib siab / Saib xyuas / Kev kawm / Faculties


  • Anthropology
  • Applied Language Studies
  • Kev kawm txog zauv applied
  • Architecture
  • Balsillie School of International Affairs
  • Biochemistry
  • Ib
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Engineering tshuaj
  • Science News for KIDS
  • Civil and Environmenal Engineering
  • Classical Studies
  • Combinatorics and Optimization
  • Lub computer Science
  • Drama and Speech Communication
  • Earth and Environmental Sciences
  • Kev tshawb fawb Esxias East
  • Economics
  • Hluav taws xob thiab Computer Engineering
  • Lus Askiv thiab ntawv nyeem
  • Lub koom haum hais lus English (Renison ELI)
  • Environment, Enterprise and Development
  • Environment, Resources and Sustainability
  • Fine Arts
  • Fabkis txoj kev tshawb fawb
  • Geography and Environmental Management
  • Germanic and Slavic Studies
  • Keeb kwm
  • Independent Studies
  • International Affair
  • Kev tshawb fawb Italian
  • Kev tshawb fawb Yudais
  • Kinesiology
  • Knowledge Integration
  • Management Sciences
  • Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering
  • Kev tshawb fawb medieval
  • Suab paj nruag
  • Nanotechnology Engineering
  • Optometry and Vision Science
  • Peace and Conflict Studies
  • Tshuaj
  • Philosophy
  • Physics thiab Astronomy
  • Tswv yim
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Public Health and Health Systems
  • Pure Mathematics
  • Recreation and Leisure Studies
  • Kev cai dab qhuas kev tshawb fawb
  • Science and Aviation
  • Science and Business
  • Sexuality, Marriage and Family
  • Social Development Studies
  • Kev ua hauj lwm
  • Sociology and Legal Studies
  • Software Engineering
  • Spanish and Latin American Studies
  • Statistics and Actuarial Science
  • Studies in Islam
  • Systems Design Engineering
  • Women’s Studies

Keeb kwm


Nyob rau hauv 1957, innovation and entrepreneurship brought University of Waterloo into being, as a group of business leaders imagined a new university built to tackle some of the world’s most daunting challenges.

It was the age of the Cold War and the space race, when a single computer filled a room. Discoveries in science, medicine and engineering were coming fast and furious. Industry leaders in Kitchener-Waterloo knew moving forward meant more than just training people in the technology of the day.

The greatest product which we will realize from our electronic era is the better educated race,” said Ira Needles, president of B.F. Goodrich Canada, in a 1956 speech that helped lay the foundation for the University of Waterloo. “This applies to all fields — not just the field of science.”

Together with J. Gerald Hagey, Waterloo’s founding president, and Rev. Cornelius Siegfried, who brought St. Jerome’s into federation with Waterloo, Needles helped lay the foundation for a new kind of purpose-driven education.

Waterloo was built to teach people to think in new ways. That meant reaching out across disciplines and faculties, sharing resources, and sparking new directions in research. It meant working hand-in-hand with industry, letting people own their intellectual property and the success that came from commercialization.

Constructed on a foundation of science, engineering and math, Waterloo has also become a leader in environmental education, architecture, the arts, psychology and human health.

A chemical engineering building was the first to rise in 1958, followed by a physics and mathematics building a year later. Waterloo’s first arts building opened in 1962, the same year the young university graduated its first class of engineers. Nyob rau hauv 1967, Waterloo became home to the country’s only English-language school of optometry.

In the early 1960s, mathematics professor Wes Graham made Waterloo among the first universities in the world to give undergraduates access to state-of-the-art computers that at the time filled a room. That spirit of risk-taking and innovation caught fire with students and researchers alike, helping to define this region’s enduring global identity as a technology powerhouse.

After Hagey’s retirement in 1969, President Burt Matthews continued to take Waterloo in new directions, adding the world’s first department of kinesiology, and programs in emerging areas including earth sciences, clinical psychology and accounting.

Building a world-changer

Nyob rau hauv 1957, innovation and entrepreneurship brought University of Waterloo into being, as a group of business leaders imagined a new university built to tackle some of the world’s most daunting challenges.

It was the age of the Cold War and the space race, when a single computer filled a room. Discoveries in science, medicine and engineering were coming fast and furious. Industry leaders in Kitchener-Waterloo knew moving forward meant more than just training people in the technology of the day.

The three founders of Waterloo

Waterloo builders: J. Gerald Hagey (left), Ira G. Needles(centre) and Reverend Cornelius Siegfried (right).

The greatest product which we will realize from our electronic era is the better educated race,” said Ira Needles, president of B.F. Goodrich Canada, in a 1956 speech that helped lay the foundation for the University of Waterloo. “This applies to all fields — not just the field of science.”

Together with J. Gerald Hagey, Waterloo’s founding president, and Rev. Cornelius Siegfried, who brought St. Jerome’s into federation with Waterloo, Needles helped lay the foundation for a new kind of purpose-driven education.

Innovative solutions, innovative education

Waterloo was built to teach people to think in new ways. That meant reaching out across disciplines and faculties, sharing resources, and sparking new directions in research. It meant working hand-in-hand with industry, letting people own their intellectual property and the success that came from commercialization.

Constructed on a foundation of science, engineering and math, Waterloo has also become a leader in environmental education, architecture, the arts, psychology and human health.

 

Chemistry and chemical engineering building, (now called Douglas Wright Engineering) under construction in 1958.

A chemical engineering building was the first to rise in 1958, followed by a physics and mathematics building a year later. Waterloo’s first arts building opened in 1962, the same year the young university graduated its first class of engineers. Nyob rau hauv 1967, Waterloo became home to the country’s only English-language school of optometry.

In the early 1960s, mathematics professor Wes Graham made Waterloo among the first universities in the world to give undergraduates access to state-of-the-art computers that at the time filled a room. That spirit of risk-taking and innovation caught fire with students and researchers alike, helping to define this region’s enduring global identity as a technology powerhouse.

After Hagey’s retirement in 1969, President Burt Matthews continued to take Waterloo in new directions, adding the world’s first department of kinesiology, and programs in emerging areas including earth sciences, clinical psychology and accounting.

Ideas start here

Partnerships with government, with the private sector, with alumni and with institutions around the world exemplify Waterloo’s impact and influence.

Over the years, millions of dollars for research have come from governments, from granting agencies and industries to support laboratories and thinkers. Spinoff companies founded by recent graduates or moonlighting professors helped drive a software- and hardware-building revolution, turning this area into what many now dub “the Silicon valley of the North.” The phrase “technology transfer” became a Waterloo staple.

With recognized excellence in co-operative education, Waterloo understands intimately the importance of connecting industry and ideas. Students infuse the companies that employ them with fresh approaches and leading edge research. They gain valuable real-world work experience, and a salary that makes education more accessible.

A powerful advocate for such activity was Doug Wright, who became the university’s third president. Wright travelled far and wide to tell governments, corporate leaders and international industrialists that what the world needed was more highly trained workers, and that as many of them as possible should come from Waterloo.

James Downey served as president 1993-99, and was followed by David Johnston, whose term saw the multi-million dollar Campaign Waterloo and a new emphasis on major projects involving “partnerships” with industry, governments and alumni. The long-anticipated research and technology park on the north campus opened, and was named in Johnston’s honour after he became Canada’s 28thGovernor General. Private and civic support provided a campus for the architecture school in Cambridge, 30 kilometres from the main Waterloo site.

As 2009 pib, a health sciences campus — home to a new school of pharmacy — opened in downtown Kitchener. An engineering campus opened in the United Arab Emirates the same year, and a digital campus opened in Stratford, Ont. in 2010. In the Sixth Decade Plan for the years 2007-17, the university detailed plans for further expansion outside Canada.

Since the arrival of President Feridun Hamdullahpur, Waterloo’s global influence has grown, through partnership agreements with institutions in Nanjing and Suzhou China, Brazil, Lub teb chaws Yelemees, and Saudi Arabia.

With an impact felt around the globe, Waterloo is consistently ranked among the top universities in Canada and the world. Driven from its very beginning to answer challenges and create solutions, this is a university dedicated to moving the world forward, one innovation at a time.


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