University of Munich

University of Munich. Study in Germany. Higher Education in Europe.

University of Munich Details

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Overview


Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich  is a public research university located in Munich, Germany.

The University of Munich is among Germany’s oldest universities. Originally established in Ingolstadt in 1472 by Duke Ludwig IX of Bavaria-Landshut, the university was moved in 1800 to Landshut by King Maximilian I of Bavaria when Ingolstadt was threatened by the French, before being relocated to its present-day location in Munich in 1826 by King Ludwig I of Bavaria. In 1802, the university was officially named Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität by King Maximilian I of Bavaria in his as well as the university’s original founder’s honour.

The University of Munich has, particularly since the 19th century, been considered as one of Germany’s as well as one of Europe’s most prestigious universities; with 34 Nobel laureates associated with the university, it ranks 13th worldwide by number of Nobel laureates. Among these were Wilhelm Röntgen, Max Planck, Werner Heisenberg, Otto Hahn and Thomas Mann. Pope Benedict XVIwas also a student and professor at the university. The LMU has recently been conferred the title of “elite university” under the German Universities Excellence Initiative.

LMU is currently the second-largest university in Germany in terms of student population; in the winter semester of 2013/2014, the university had a total of 50,542 matriculated students. Of these, 8,719 were freshmen while international students totalled 7,403 or almost 15% of the student population. As for operating budget, the university records in 2013 a total of 571.3 million Euros in funding without the university hospital; with the university hospital, the university has a total funding amounting to approximately 1.5 billion Euros.

Get an idea of who we are – the university in the heart of Munich. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München is one of the leading research universities in Europe, with a more than 500-year-long tradition. The University is committed to the highest international standards of excellence in research and teaching.

As one of Europe’s leading research universities, LMU looks back on 500 years of tradition and forward to the challenges and responsibilities ahead. Its excellence in teaching and research embraces a wide diversity of fields—from the humanities and cultural studies through law, economics and social sciences to medicine and natural sciences. An intense interdisciplinary approach fosters the innovation so critical to our global future.

LMU’s faculty—whether they are early career professors or internationally renowned prize-winners—form the foundation of the University’s distinguished record in research. Their expertise, dedication, and creativity underpin the University’s success in the Germany-wide Excellence Initiative, a competition in which LMU has won the largest amount of grant support awarded to a single institution. These resources are being used to enhance our shared pursuit of knowledge, a constantly evolving process.

LMU is home to students from all parts of Germany and more than 130 countries around the globe. They benefit from the University’s uniquely wide array of study programs and its strong focus on research. At all stages of academic training we emphasize the links between research and course content. Our students view their studies as a springboard to a rewarding career, not least because Munich is one of Germany’s major centers for technology and the media.

Academic diversity thrives in an environment that encompasses social skills alongside a critical awareness of values and history. This includes the Munich legacy of the Weisse Rose, the student-based resistance group that opposed Nazism.

When you come to LMU, you are joining a community dedicated to making the most of their talents, curiosity, and opportunities. I am both honored and humbled to be part of this community.

Prof. Dr. Bernd Huber
President, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Schools / Colleges / Departments / Courses / Faculties


  • Faculty of Catholic Theology
  • Faculty of Protestant Theology
  • Faculty of Law
  • Faculty of Business Administration
  • Faculty of Economics
  • Faculty of Medicine
  • Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
  • Faculty for History and the Arts
  • Faculty of Philosophy, Philosophy of Science and Study of Religion
  • Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences
  • Faculty for the Study of Culture
  • Faculty for Languages and Literatures
  • Faculty of Social Sciences
  • Faculty of Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics
  • Faculty of Physics
  • Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy
  • Faculty of Biology
  • Faculty of Geosciences and Environmental Sciences

History


The university was founded with papal approval in 1472 as the University of Ingolstadt (foundation right of Louis IX the Rich), with faculties of philosophy, medicine, jurisprudence and theology. Its first rector was Christopher Mendel of Steinfels, who later became bishop of Chiemsee.

In the period of German humanism, the university’s academics included names such as Conrad Celtes and Petrus Apianus. The theologian Johann Eck also taught at the university. From 1549 to 1773, the university was influenced by the Jesuits and became one of the centres of the Counter-Reformation. The Jesuit Petrus Canisius served as rector of the university.

At the end of the 18th century, the university was influenced by the Enlightenment, which led to a stronger emphasis on natural science.

In 1800, the Prince-Elector Maximilianv IV Joseph (the later Maximilian I, King of Bavaria) moved the university to Landshut, due to French aggression that threatened Ingolstadt during the Napoleonic Wars. In 1802, the university was renamed the Ludwig Maximilian University in honour of its two founders, Louis IX, Duke of Bavaria and Maximilian I, Elector of Bavaria. The Minister of Education, Maximilian von Montgelas, initiated a number of reforms that sought to modernize the rather conservative and Jesuit-influenced university. In 1826, it was moved to Munich, the capital of the Kingdom of Bavaria. The university was situated in the Old Academy until a new building in the Ludwigstraße was completed. The locals were somewhat critical of the amount of Protestant professors Maximilian and later Ludwig I invited to Munich. They were dubbed the “Nordlichter” (Northern lights) and especially physician Johann Nepomuk von Ringseis was quite angry about them.

In the second half of the 19th century, the university rose to great prominence in the European scientific community, attracting many of the world’s leading scientists. It was also a period of great expansion. From 1903, women were allowed to study at Bavarian universities, and by 1918, the female proportion of students at LMU had reached 18%. In 1918, Adele Hartmann became the first woman in Germany to earn theHabilitation (higher doctorate), at LMU.

During the Weimar Republic, the university continued to be one of the world’s leading universities, with professors such as Wilhelm Röntgen,Wilhelm Wien, Richard Willstätter, Arnold Sommerfeld and Ferdinand Sauerbruch.

The university has continued to be one of the leading universities of West Germany during the Cold War and in the post-reunification era. In the late 1960s, the university was the scene of protests by radical students.

Today the University of Munich is part of 24 Collaborative Research Centers funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and is host university of 13 of them. It also hosts 12 DFG Research Training Groups and three international doctorate programs as part of the Elite Network of Bavaria. It attracts an additional 120 million euros per year in outside funding and is intensively involved in national and international funding initiatives.

LMU Munich has a wide range of degree programs, with 150 subjects available in numerous combinations. 15% of the 45,000 students who attend the university come from abroad.

In 2005, Germany’s state and federal governments launched the German Universities Excellence Initiative, a contest among its universities. With a total of 1.9 billion euros, 75 percent of which comes from the federal state, its architects aim to strategically promote top-level research andscholarship. The money is given to more than 30 research universities in Germany.

The initiative will fund three project-oriented areas: graduate schools to promote the next generation of scholars, clusters of excellence to promote cutting-edge research and “future concepts” for the project-based expansion of academic excellence at universities as a whole. In order to qualify for this third area, a university had to have at least one internationally recognized academic center of excellence and a new graduate school.

After the first round of selections, LMU Munich was invited to submit applications for all three funding lines: It entered the competition with proposals for two graduate schools and four clusters of excellence.

On Friday 13 October 2006, a blue-ribbon panel announced the results of the Germany-wide Excellence Initiative for promoting top university research and education. The panel, composed of the German Research Foundation and the German Science Council, has decided that LMU Munich will receive funding for all three areas covered by the Initiative: one graduate school, three “excellence clusters” and general funding for the university’s “future concept”.


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