Case Western Reserve University

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Case Western Reserve University Details

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Overview


Case Western Reserve University is a private institution that was founded in 1826.

Tuition fees in Case Western Reserve University are $45,000 (Aprox.).

Case Western Reserve University is known for its world class research, but with more than 150 student organizations, there are plenty of opportunities to get involved outside the classroom, too. The Case Western Spartans varsity teams compete in the Division III University Athletic Association. The Greek system, which stresses a commitment to on-campus and community service, involves about one third of students. The campus is located about 20 minutes from downtown Cleveland, where students have free access to a handful of downtown museums like the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Great Lakes Science Center. On campus, freshmen live in one of four themed residential communities, which are called Cedar, Juniper, Magnolia and Mistletoe. All students are invited to the annual SpringFest, a collection of music, carnival games and activities that is the largest student-run event on campus.

Case Western Reserve University boasts a broad range of top-rated specialty graduate programs, like its health law curriculum at the School of Law. The university also has renowned offerings in biomedical engineering at the School of Engineering and nonprofit management at the Weatherhead School of Management. In addition to its suburban campus, the school owns University Farm, a 389-acre plot of land about 10 miles from campus where students research and take courses in biology, ecology and art. Notable alumni include former U.S. Representative Dennis Kucinich and Craig Newmark, creator and namesake of Web site Craigslist.

Schools / Colleges / Departments / Courses / Faculties


Case School of Engineering

Internationally renowned for education and research, the Case School of Engineering develops leaders prepared to solve today’s—and tomorrow’s—most pressing issues.

College of Arts and Sciences

Home to education and research in arts, humanities, mathematics, social, physical and biological sciences, the College of Arts and Sciences offers high-quality programs, whether on the stage or in the lab.

Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing

From clinical specialists to nurse practitioners, teachers to researchers, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing graduates pursue a variety of roles. With our location near top hospital systems, our students get hands-on experience learning from the best.

Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

Consistently ranked one of the top 10 social work schools in America, the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences offers an innovative combination of field work and rigorous education—on campus or online.

School of Dental Medicine

The School of Dental Medicine provides relevant, experiential and active learning in oral health education, patient care, research and scholarship. Our students put their learning to practice, providing quality dental care services to our community.

School of Law

The School of Law’s brand-new curriculum allows you to work with clients from the start, develop leadership skills and hone your writing—not to mention learn the core tenets of a legal education. Here, you’ll have access to the nation’s top firms and organizations—and graduate ready to lead.

School of Medicine

With strong partnerships among some of the nation’s top hospital systems, including No. 4 Cleveland Clinic and No. 18 University Hospitals, the School of Medicine leads in medical education and research. As a top-25 medical school, we prepare physicians to care for patients with competence and compassion.

Weatherhead School of Management

Through its interdisciplinary approach to management education, the Weatherhead School of Management develops strong leaders who create sustainable value, are good global citizens and have immediate impact on their organizations.

Office of Undergraduate Studies

The Office of Undergraduate Studies oversees the academic aspects of student affairs, working with undergraduates across all schools and majors. From matriculation to graduation, the office helps students achieve their academic goals.

School of Graduate Studies

The School of Graduate Studies offers graduate programs in more than 80 disciplines across the schools and college, from the humanities and social sciences to biological and physical sciences to engineering and professional fields.

History


Western Reserve College was founded in 1826 in Hudson, Ohio, which, at the time, was the region’s most populated area and named for th eConnecticut Western Reserve, out of which the area arose. The nearby city of Cleveland, located about 26 miles (42 km) to its northwest, had only begun to grow. Western Reserve College, or “Reserve” as it was popularly called, was the first college in northern Ohio.

By 1875, a number of other schools had been established nearby, and Cleveland had emerged as clearly the dominant population and business center of the region. In 1882, with funding from Amasa Stone, Western Reserve College moved to Cleveland and changed its name to Western Reserve University.

In 1877, Leonard Case Jr. began laying the groundwork for the Case School of Applied Science by secretly donating valuable pieces of Cleveland real estate to a trust. He asked his confidential advisor, Henry Gilbert Abbey, to administer the trust and to keep it secret until after his death. The Case School of Applied Science was issued a charter by the state of Ohio in 1882, four months after Case’s death.

For the first four years of the school’s existence, it was located in the Case family’s home on Rockwell Street in downtown Cleveland. Classes were held in the family house, while the chemistry and physics laboratories were on the second floor of the barn.

Amasa Stone’s gift to relocate Western Reserve College to Cleveland also included a provision for the purchase of land in the University Circle area, adjacent to Western Reserve University, for the Case School of Applied Science. The school moved to University Circle in 1885.

During World War II, Case Institute of Applied Science was one of 131 colleges and universities nationally that took part in the V-12 Navy College Training Program which offered students a path to a Navy commission.

Over time, the Case School of Applied Science grew to encompass a broader vision, adopting the name Case Institute of Technology in 1947 to reflect the institution’s growing stature.

Although the trustees of Case Institute of Technology and Western Reserve University did not formally federate their institutions until 1967, the union had been seen by many as inevitable for decades before that.[6] The institutions already shared buildings and staff when necessary and worked together often. One such example was seen in 1887, when Case physicist Albert Michelson and Reserve chemist Edward Morley collaborated on the famous Michelson–Morley experiment.

There had been some discussion of a merger of the two institutions as early as 1890, but those talks dissolved quickly. In the 1920s, the Survey Commission on Higher Education in Cleveland took a strong stand in favor of federation and the community was behind the idea as well, but in the end all that came of the study was a decision by the two institutions to cooperate in founding Cleveland College, a special unit for part-time and adult students in downtown Cleveland.

By the 1960s, Reserve President John Schoff Millis and Case President T. Keith Glennan shared the idea that federation would create a complete university, one better able to attain national distinction. Financed by the Carnegie Corporation, Cleveland Foundation, Greater Cleveland Associated Foundation, and several local donors, a study commission of national leaders in higher education and public policy was charged with exploring the idea of federation. The Heald Commission, so known for its chair, former Ford Foundation President Henry T. Heald, issued its final report, “Vision of a University.” The report predicted that federation would create one of the largest private universities in the nation, with a combined faculty larger than that of Princeton, Chicago, Stanford, or Johns Hopkins.

Case Institute of Technology, a school of science and engineering, and Western Reserve University, known for its strong liberal arts and professional programs, came together in 1967 to form Case Western Reserve University.


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